Oct 30, 2014
Tea Party Tribune
Tea Party Tribune
Tea Party and Political News Reporting

An Excerpt from ” The American Way: Why Superman Got it Wrong”

   

fbtilebevelamwayBy Thomas Purcell

My new book, “The American Way: Why Superman Got it Wrong” goes to print this week and will be in bookstores nationwide later this month.


“The American Way” describes in detail how American Exceptionalism was a hard won process; and not something in our blood our DNA. The path from a small group of stalwart farmers, to that of the most powerful and wealthy nation in the history of mankind was remarkably swift compared to the previous civilizations of Rome, Egypt, and the European powers of Edwardian England and Napoleonic France. How America got there is a matter of historical record, but today the world is seeking America to be more like them– socialized and stagnant. Instead, “The American Way” explains why the reverse should be true– that the rest of the world should be more like America.

 This is a brief excerpt (edited for size to print here) discussing the role of slavery in America, how it held back real progress, and it’s link to illegal immigration which flattens economic growth in the same way:
…The economies of both the North and South now exploded in post Civil War America, and it was mostly due to the collapse of slavery. America was not built on slave labor–it had been held back by theories of a more localized economy and ultra cheap labor driven by slavery. These are the very theories that are developing and being promoted today as a method to economic expansion. By keeping peoples tethered to land either by the ball and chain such as in the 1860 plantation south, or by modern day ‘green’ policies and government subsidies, a nation artificially crease stagnation and economic ennui. Profits and economic growth come from the movement and exchange of goods, not by barter and exchange, or locally controlled interests. The profit motive is a powerful force that is negated by the availability of cheap and plentiful labor…
…Importantly, the Civil War forced the North to institute a series of banking laws that allowed them access to cheap money and cash flow to buy weapons and goods from overseas. President Lincoln developed a national banking system and pushed for protective tariffs to be placed on goods made overseas, making American made goods cheaper to the average consumer.  Methods of mass production, industrialization, scientific management and quality control expanded greatly in post Civil War America mainly because there was not enough cheap labor to meet the demands of the explosive population growth of 1870-1920 America, even with the introduction of nearly four million slaves into the labor pool. It had to; there was no other way to meet the dual demands of goods and profits by the new group of industrialist tycoons gaining sway over the American economic landscape…
..Take for example a modern strawberry farm. These farms are still picked largely by hand, with an average worker taking between 30 minutes and an hour to fill a single flat of 10 punnets  (about a pint). Modern machinery that might pick strawberries at five to ten times the rate a man could pick them are still only on the drawing board mainly due to development costs which might cost hundreds of millions or perhaps billions of dollars. The end result of an automatic machine would be lower prices eventually at market for a punnet of strawberries and higher wage jobs for people to sell, repair and maintain the equipment. But there is no driving reason for business to use or develop these machines, since labor is still cheap and available; thus the profit motive is substantially reduced…
…In 1860, the northern states were more self sufficient and relied more on economic development of wages and industry. They developed new and more advanced factories and farming techniques since they could not rely on cheap slave labor. As slavery was abolished, world resource prices plunged and almost led to an economic collapse of foreign economies by 1875. Cotton prices overseas halved almost instantly upon Dixie’s loss to the Yankees because Northern Reconstructionists were now developing the South’s cotton fields with better technology and farming techniques that were developed to compete with the South in pre Civil War America. However, the collapse of cotton pricing and decimation of the previous wealthy plantation owners resulted in significant gains overall for the American economy. In 1860, the Federal government was collecting revenues of approximately 64.6 million in taxation. By 1890, and the reinvention of a slave economy into an industrialized one was nearly completed, those revenues were now well over 470 million dollars, despite the technology and taxation schedules of 1860 being little different than the technology of 1890 …
…The North, due to the lack of cheap slave labor, had to haul goods over further distances than Southern states, which could simply grow their own food supplies locally. Modern day liberal theory suggests locally grown food and supplies is more efficient and beneficial, but the historical record of American economic development shows this to be in error. Northern states developed much more extensive transportation and communication methods such as steam locomotion and telegraphy. The technologies were a boom to post Civil War America, when they applied these largely Northern technologies to the wide open farmlands of the South. Cheaper cotton prices (which also had also been elevated in collusion by Dixie cotton farmers) meant factories could now mass produce textiles and other goods for sale overseas, rather than selling the cotton itself…
…Thus the dragging affect of ultra cheap labor such as slavery is mimicked today in modern agriculture and business with the availability of large amounts of illegal immigrant labor. The flattening of middle class wages, quality of goods and costs of resources, are all artificially being flattened by the massive influx of illegal immigration, primarily from areas such as Mexico, Guatemala and other third world Central American countries. As long as substantial amounts of cheap labor are available to modern agribusiness (as well as other industries), there is little to no need to push forward with technologies that would be relatively expensive to develop and use compared to immigrant labor. By removing the substantial effect of the profit motive from business, it has been counterproductive to economic growth…
…Many modern economists promote civic planning and social constructs around localization of farming and controlling the living and working conditions through regulation, rather than by free market forces. The discouragement of suburbanization and agribusiness is acclaimed as a method to live a simpler lifestyle and thus be more profitable. But American Exceptionalism and experience has shown this method to be false and while it may appealing on the surface to political standards, in the long haul is antithetical to economic expansion and destructive to the overall quality of life in America…
Look for “The American Way: Why Superman Got It Wrong” in bookstores everywhere, and on Amazon and Barnes and Noble later this month, as well in e-reader and Kindle formats.

Thomas Purcell

Tom was born in Yonkers, NY and in 1968 was the youngest member of Mensa in the country at that time- and is to date, the highest tested individual in Mensa at that age. Educated at the University of California, Tom moved to Arizona after college in 1994, and went into the insurance business. After being a top agent for NY Life Insurance, he decided to become an independent broker in 2005 (Lotusbenefits.com) and is now a successful enterpreneur and author of the column 'Conservative Issues from the Desert'. He calls Glendale, AZ his home, where he does volunteer work for various issues around the state.

Conservative, funny and a candidly frank speaker, Tom is available for consultation and speaking engagements on subjects from politics to marketing. "The Return of the Kings" is now available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble nationwide. Look for his next book, "The American Beacon" this Fall.
You can read more of his musings and articles at www.thomas-purcell.com , as well as excerpts from his novel, where he welcomes comments, discussion and offers free subscriptions..
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