Utah Burning

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Utah Burning

Utah Burning. It’s 21st century America, a time and place of great hope and excitement thanks to a swelling economy, rapid transit, and limitless technology. It’s a country whose constitution guarantees that those with drive, willingness to work, and solid Utah Burning family values can make their way forward, unfettered by concerns over corrupt local officials, or state funded piracy. And, this constitution, the foundation of our great nation is protected by the willingness of our veteran soldiers, so willing to fight and die for us; for the idea of America. This gives us freedoms so coveted by the peoples of third world nations, that many will risk all to come to the land of the free, the home of the brave. Arching overhead, like the great timeless forms made only by God, is the protection of equality through the rule of law, paid for in blood.

But there is a worm eating quietly away at the heart of this country. This worm, grown fat and indolent on the flesh trade, is openly funding its existence in the trafficking of children. This isn’t some kind of disgruntled attack on some CPS organization that is doing what social workers with a little bit of power do; this is a rogue agency that is no joke, going after people of means in order to keep themselves paid in a cushy job that requires nothing of them in the way of accountability. In the case we are going to examine, the children targeted by these thugs are the children of a disabled veteran, who earned her disability while in service. Thus, the DCFS (hereafter referred to as “the Division”) can take their veteran benefits.

But the vile truth is, they are also the children of a deceased war veteran, decorated with a Purple Heart, three bronze stars, a silver star, and a congressional Medal of Honor. The mother is also a former police officer. This gives the Division the social security from their dead father, and expansive benefits, including some two thousand dollars a month from the state of Texas. For the pirates of the Deseret, this is a big haul. So let’s take a look at how the landed this big take, and how it is that they land big fish in Utah.

Since this case is too big to unpack in one article, we will stick with the main points, saving the details for later. It all starts with a referral. In this case the referral was made by an eleven year old girl, herself in big trouble with the Division. The girl was all too willing to tell her teacher that one of the children of the targeted family had revealed abuse to her. The teacher told the principal, and the principal called the eagerly waiting Division worker. Caseworkers were dispatched the next day, as the target was in counseling at the school on the day of the referral.

No fewer than three caseworkers badgered and bullied the girl with the principal’s help until she caved under the pressure giving three separate versions of the story. That’s right, three versions, involving two different places at the same time, and two different weapons. Did I mention that the child was a special needs student whom the principal just decided looked appropriate enough for regular classes? Additionally, there was no physical evidence of abuse. None!

The Division and the school of course declined to contact the mother for fourteen days citing that the targeted child had declared herself distraught that an adult knew of this, and they (the Division), feared further harm to the child if the mother became aware that she had “revealed” abuse. Step two, open a closed case in another state where a sibling of the targeted girl had alleged abuse, and try to make it fit into the Division’s petition as if he had revealed abuse to them. I’m not kidding, they really did that. A lot.

Fast forward fourteen days, and the same little girl tells the same teacher, who tells the same principal another fib, who dutifully relays the fib to the Division. This results in the targeted child easily acquiescing to the lie, since, after all, that’s how she got them to quit bothering her the first time, and nothing happened then. This time the allegation was very specific about the type of assault, the location of the assault, the weapon used, and the specific location of the weapon.

Three Division caseworkers and, for some reason a homicide detective come to the house. An exhaustive search of the house is conducted after a search of the specific location yielded no weapon. Again, no weapon, no evidence of injury. The result has been that the Division has moved this case into court, and they are demanding that the mother plead “nolo contendere” or risk losing the children. The attorney demands that she do the same to mitigate her risk of losing the kids. As most people over the age of sixteen know, nolo contendere means “guilty” but please take it easy on me. The thing is, our research tells us that in most cases where the respondent to such petitions plead out, they wind up funding two or three caseworkers, an attorney ad litem, and various other Division activities for several months, if not longer. Further, if the respondent pleads out, they are forever marked as an abuser by the system. Of course, there’s too much to fit into an article like this one, and the story is not yet told, but look for one of two articles in the near future: Utah Rising, or “Who will come to the aid of a poor widow’s son”. It’s the 21st century in America after all, and anything is possible. Meanwhile Utah Burning!

 

Bill the Butcher
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I write right off the top of my head. I’m direct, funny, and simple. The key word is, “simple.” I have a high school education from Killeen High in Killeen, Texas, and that’s about as illiterate as you can be, and they still let you drive a car. No use trying to slander me. If you want to dig dirt on me you’d better bring a dump truck, because friend, I’ve done it all. If there was anything I missed it’s only because no one told me about it, because if they did, well, I’d have done that, too! I call myself, “A Simple Ol’ Boy From Austin,” because when I fall short I can always say, “Hey, I told you from the start that I was stupid.”

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